Sermon Notes

Check back every week and read the sermon notes to get a better understanding of the sermon.

Sunday, April 5th 2020

Sermon Notes

Palm Sunday

 

Isaiah 50:4-9, Matthew 21: 1-11 and Philippians 2:5-11

This Sunday we enter into one of the most significant weeks of the Christian

faith. We begin Holy Week on Palm Sunday with shouts of “Hosanna! Hosanna!” 

only to hear Crucify! Crucify! by Friday. Our journey on Sunday weaves us

through three scriptures. Each passage represents the darkness of Holy Week, 

yet each passage represents God’s unfailing love. I hope that we will read each

passage aloud. As we hear our own voice, let’s place ourselves within the

crowd. Are we waving our palm branches? Do we see Jesus riding on a

donkey? As Jesus passes in front of us, there’s pushing and shoving, everyone

is trying to catch a glance of Jesus. Will Jesus notice us in the crowd? 


Isaiah 50 is about the Prophet Isaiah talking to the faithful who faced the dark

prospect of Babylonian captivity. Captivity caused by their own unfaithfulness, 

yet not beyond God’s power of redemption. My prayer is that we see the image

of a Suffering Servant who seeks the lost, unfaithful and disobedient. This image

of the Suffering Servant is further described in Paul’s words to the church in

Philippi, “Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus, who though he

was in the form of God, did not regard equality with God as something to be

exploited, but emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, being born in human

likeness. And being found in human form, he humbled himself and became

obedient to the point of death—even on a cross.” Philippians 2:5-8


As I read each passage, a new way of thinking about Palm Sunday and Holy

Week jumped from the pages. As we strive to have the mind of Christ, it moves

us from individually focused to other centered. The transformed mind, in Christ, 

not only confesses Jesus Christ as Lord but according to Richard Rohr, “Life is

not about us, but we are about life.” Rohr goes on to say that we do not have to

figure it all out, straighten it all out, or even do it perfectly by ourselves. We do

not have to be God. It is an enormous weight off our backs. All we have to do is

participate. 


Isn’t that the true invitation of Palm Sunday, an invitation to participate? 

Participate in not just a parade but in the Passion of Christ. Before we begin the

journey of the week, let us rest in God’s presence for a few moments. 



Strength and grace for the Journey

Pastor Tom